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Boston EMS to Receive Humanitarian Award for Exceptional Response to Boston Marathon Bombings

Chief James Hooley to speak at Emergency Management Summit
Public safety, first response and homeland security officials from across the region will gather today at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center for the Boston Emergency Management Summit to share best practices and to work on new solutions and approaches to emergency responses in Massachusetts.
Boston Emergency Medical Services

Boston Emergency Medical Services (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


Boston EMS will be recognized at the Summit with the 2013 Disaster Preparedness Humanitarian Award for its role in responding to the Boston Marathon bombings. The two explosions that occurred within seconds of each other near the finish line of the 117th marathon claimed the lives of three people and injured more than 200 others. Remarkably, every patient transported by ambulance from the scene survived their injuries. Boston EMS has been widely praised for its immediate and well-coordinated response, which included triage, treatment, transportation and distribution of patients.

Chief James Hooley will accept the award on behalf of Boston EMS: “I am honored to accept this award on behalf of the EMTs and Paramedics of Boston EMS who displayed extraordinary courage, skills and resourcefulness on that day. This was a team effort which demonstrated the value of training, preparedness and cooperation between Boston EMS, our private ambulance partners, other public safety agencies, our hospitals, as well as the many volunteers and bystanders who did not hesitate to assist.”

“The professionalism and preparedness of the Boston EMS undoubtedly saved lives at the marathon. Their quick response and dedication to those injured is a testament to their training and the relationships we have with our first response partners in the city,” Mayor Thomas M. Menino said.

As part of the award, Chief Hooley will also provide a firsthand account of the response, reporting on how Boston EMS and volunteers managed a mass casualty event with speed, efficiency, and compassion.

The summit brings together leaders who drive the nation’s prevention, protection, response and recovery operations. Emergency Management is a division of e.Republic, the nation’s only media and research company focused exclusively on state and local government and education. The company produces several highly-regarded industry publications, including Governing Magazine and Government Technology.

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Holiday Incident Continued Search for Missing Firefighter

Santa Fe National Forest

Santa Fe National Forest (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tuesday, September 3, 2013 – The
search for Jemez Ranger District (Santa Fe National Forest) wildland
firefighter
, Token Adams, was hampered again yesterday by heavy
afternoon rains. The steep, rugged, dense terrain has also
challenged efforts despite the over 250 personnel involved in the
search. The terrain in the vicinity of the search is described as
extreme topography with steep uphill and downhill trails and sheer cliffs.

Token, the engine captain on a Jemez Ranger District engine has been missing for four days. The last communication from Token was received on Friday afternoon from Holiday Mesa. He and other firefighters from the Ranger District were responding to a smoke report and searching for the 25-acre School House Fire located near School House Mesa.

Despite the NM Search and Rescue grid pattern being used by the professional and dedicated personnel on the
incident, search efforts have not been successful. Personnel are using GPS as part of this grid pattern and are being asked to report their locations hourly. Searchers will focus today on determining that certain areas have been fully searched.

Weather predictions for today and tonight are for a 60% chance of showers and thunderstorms which will
once again affect both air and ground operations.

The Southwest Incident Management Type 1 Team, Incident Commander Joe Reinarz, will assume command of search
efforts as part of a unified command along with multiple Federal, State, County and local agencies, on Wednesday morning at 6:00 a.m.

The family continues to ask that their privacy be respected during this difficult time.

Over 100 LAFD Firefighters Battle a Motel Blaze in Van Nuys; 4 Occupants Injured

THIS ARTICLE IS REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION FROM THE OFFICIAL BLOG OF THE LOS ANGELES FIRE DEPARTMENT.  aS THE LAFD POINTS OUT THE FIRE COULD HAVE BEEN A LOT LESS COSTLY AND EASIER TO FIGHT IF THE MOTEL’S GUESTS HAD TAKEN A SECOND TO CLOSE THEIR ROOM DOORS ON THE WAY OUT. THEY ARE NOT OUT TO BLAME ANYBODY, BUT LIKE US WANT EVERYBODY TO LEARN WHAT WE CAN FROM THIS INCIDENT. WHEN FIRES HAPPEN CLOSED DOORS SAVE LIVES !

VAN NUYS – Over 100 Los Angeles Firefighters battled a blaze in a Van Nuys motel where four were injured on August 24, 2013.

At 11:14 am the Los Angeles Fire Department (LAFD) arrived at 6500 Sepulveda Boulevard in four minutes to find smoke billowing out of the second story of a two-story “O” shaped motel, named the Voyager Motor Inn. Additional companies were immediately requested.

LAFD Battles a Greater Alarm Motel Blaze in Van Nuys; 4 Injured Firefighters rushed inside with hose-lines and laddered the second story windows helping trapped victims to safely escape. Additional firefighters performed vertical ventilation on the roof with chainsaws while others kicked in doors of units to perform rapid Search and Rescue operations.

Fire attack was difficult due to the building lay out and the volume of fire throughout the second floor. The motel had 120 units, 60 were occupied.

The fire appeared to have originated in unit 246. The occupant rushed out leaving the door open and the flames rapidly spread, additional occupants did the same, causing the fire to blow down the hallways like a horizontal chimney, fueled by a light wind.

LAFD Battles a Greater Alarm Motel Blaze in Van Nuys; 4 Injured The bulk of the damage occurred on the second floor. Flames and smoke damaged approximately 50 units, and multiple units on the first floor suffered water damage. The motel was equipped with smoke alarms, not with fire sprinklers.

The flames were confined to the motel and no nearby structures were damaged. A total of  147 firefighters (including those initially dispatched and additional firefighters assisting with overhaul), all under the command of Battalion Chief Don Reyes, extinguished the flames in one hour and 16 minutes. Firefighters remained in an offensive attack.

The LAFD worked closely with various departments and organizations including CERT. The Emergency Management Department played a key role in collaborating the with the American Red Cross and with Recreation and Parks to open up the Delano Recreation Center for the approximately 50 displaced residents. Additionally, Metropolitan Transportation Authority was utilized to transport these residents from the fire scene to the shelter location. LAPD assisted with scene security and authentication of proper occupants during the collection of personal property.

LAFD Battles a Greater Alarm Motel Blaze in Van Nuys; 4 InjuredA total of four persons were treated on scene. Three patients ranging from a five month-old female to a 32 year-old female, all with non-life-threatening injuries were transported to local hospitals. No one was burned.

The cause of the fire is Undetermined, and remains under active investigation by the LAFD Arson Section. The estimated dollar loss is still being tabulated.

Dispatched Units:  E39 E288 T88 E90 RA881 E100 RA100 E289 T89 EM14 BC5 BC10 E102 E81 BC14 E489 E7 E273 T73 E293 T93 DC1 EM17 BC12 UR88 T27 E227 E27 UR27 BC5 AR2 RA27 RA39 EA1 E290 T90 E261 T61 E105 E83 RA88 RA90 EM9 T60 E260 E5 E26 T12 E212 E27 DC1 BC14 T39 E239

Submitted by Erik Scott, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

Tourists, Residents Flee Huge Fire Near Yosemite

More and updated information on the RIM Fire out in California. This information comes from the website of  a local radio station, and was called to our attention by the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services.

Tourists, Residents Flee Huge Fire Near Yosemite.

Apartment Building Fire Injures Teenager; LAFD Offers Two Teachable Lessons

THE FOLLOWING IS REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION FROM THE OFFICIAL BLOG OF THE LOS ANGELES FIRE DEPARTMENT

LOS ANGELES – On August 1, 2013, LAFD Firefighters battled a preventable fire in a two-story apartment building that injured a 16 year-old girl.

LAFD Battles Apartment Fire that Injures Teenager Just after 11:00 A.M. firefighters were summoned to a Structure Fire on the 900 block of E Adams Boulevard, where they found fire blowing out of one unit on the second floor of a two-story Center Hallway Apartment. Additional firefighters were immediately requested.

Due to an aggressive attack firefighters were able to quickly get water on the flames before they consumed the building. Approximately 35 firefighters, all under the command of Battalion Chief Surgey Tomlinson, extinguished the fire in just 17 minutes. The flames were confined to one-unit that was well involved in fire on second floor.

Dispatched Units: E10 E210 T10 RA810 E9 T9 RA9 E21 SQ21 EM11 BC1 BC18 E15 RA14 E221 T21 E215 T15 DC1 BC11 AR1 RA814 AR17

One patient, a 16 year-old girl, suffered smoke inhalation and was transported to a local hospital for evaluation. LAFD Arson Investigators determined the cause of the fire was a candle accidentally falling from a window ledge and landing on the bed. The occupants attempted to extinguish the fire with water, and thought they had, however the embers continued smoldering and reignited.

Your Los Angeles Firefighters offer two teachable lessons from this fire.

First: Candle fires are preventable! Did you know?…

– On average, 42 home candle fires are reported every day.
– More than half of all candle fires start when something that could burn, such as furniture, mattresses – or bedding, curtains, or decorations is too close to the candle.
– Over one-third (36%) of home candle fires begin in the bedroom.
– One-half of home candle fire deaths occur between Midnight and 6 am.
– Young children and older adults have the highest death risk from candle fires.

Simple Tips:
– If you do use candles, ensure they are in sturdy metal, glass or ceramic holders and placed where they cannot be easily knocked down.
– Avoid using candles in bedrooms and sleeping areas.
– Keep candles at least 12 inches from anything that can burn.
– And NEVER leave burning candles unattended!

Second: If you have a fire at home call 9-1-1 immediately to summon the local Fire Department who will ensure it is properly extinguished.

Submitted by Erik Scott, Spokesman
Los Angeles Fire Department

California’s Zero Tolerance of Illegal Fireworks CAL FIRE Offers Fireworks Safety This Fourth of July

CalFire sends out some great fireworks safety tips, and warns that California has zero tolerance for illegal fireworks.

CAL FIRE – News Releases.

INCIDENT UPDATE: Apartment Fire on Underwood

Large and small skillets

Large and small skillets (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

THE END OF THIS STORY CONTAINS SOME GOOD FIRE PREVENTION TIPS WE SHOULD ALL BE REMINDED OF.  THANKS TO THE HOUSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT FOR SHARING THIS EXAMPLE OF WHY SUCH STEPS ARE SO IMPORTANT.

WHAT: Apartment Fire with Victim Transport

WHEN: The Houston Fire Department was dispatched to the fire just after 12:30 a.m. this morning, June 10, 2013.

WHERE: 2475 Underwood

INJURIES: One resident was transported to the hospital and was reported to be in stable condition.

DAMAGE: The apartment suffered from about $4 thousand in estimated damage.

CAUSE: The cause of the fire was determined to be a cooking fire in the kitchen.

DETAILS: Firefighters arrived on scene to find smoke coming from the 3-story apartment building with a report of a possible person trapped. The crew of Engine 37 and Ladder 33 located a victim in a wheelchair and helped to remove her from the apartment.  She was treated on scene and transported to the hospital. Crews extinguished a small fire in the kitchen area and tapped out the fire just before 1:30 a.m.  Approximately 60 firefighters responded to the incident.

HFD reminds residents that cooking is the number one cause of residential fires and is preventable by following these safety tips:

• Always, have a working smoke detector!
• Over half the people attempting to extinguish a kitchen fire are injured. Often the best advice is to get everyone out of the house and call the fire department (911) from a neighbor’s house.
• Use a moderate cooking temperature
• Don’t overfill the container
• If you must leave the kitchen, turn the burner off (Unattended cooking is the primary cause of kitchen fires. Over half of these are grease/oil fires.)
• Turn pot handles away from the front of the stove. Curious children may reach up and grab the handle, pulling the hot contents down on themselves.
• Don’t position handles over another burner, it may catch on fire or burn someone who touches it.
• Wear short sleeves or tight fitting long sleeves when cooking to reduce a clothing fire hazard.
• Shield yourself from scalding steam when lifting lids from hot pans.
• Make sure pot holders are not too close to the stove. They could catch fire!
• Keep ovens, broilers, stove tops, and exhaust ducts free from grease.
• If there is a fire in the oven – Turn off the oven and keep the oven door closed.
• Never try to move the pan, don’t throw water on it, and don’t put flour on it.
• If you attempt to extinguish the fire, it is best to use a class ABC multipurpose fire extinguisher. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions – stay back 6 to 8 feet and be careful not to spray the grease out of the pan. Baking soda can also smother the fire. Fires can double in size every 30 seconds.